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Pluckley is said to be the most haunted village in Britain. It is reputed to have twelve (possibly thirteen or fourteen) ghosts.

 

* The spectre of the highwayman Robert Du Bois speared to a tree at Fright Corner (Even though the tree is now gone).
* A phantom coach and horses, allegedly manifesting in the vicinity of Maltman's Hill.
* The ghost of a Gypsy woman who burned to death in her sleep.
* The black ghost of a miller haunting the ruins of a windmill near "The Pinnocks".
* The hanging body of a schoolmaster in Dicky Buss's Lane.
* A colonel who hanged himself in Park Wood.
* The screaming ghost of a man being smothered by a wall of clay at the brickworks.
* The Lady of Rose Court, who is said to have eaten poisoned berries in despair over a love triangle.
* The Phantom Monk of "Greystones", a house built in 1863. There is a suggestion he may have been the unrequited love object of the Lady of Rose Court.
* The White Lady of Dering, a young woman apparently buried inside 7 coffins and an oak sarcophagus who haunts the chuchyard of St. Nicholas's Church.
* The Red Lady, reputedly an earlier member of the same ancient Dering family who also haunts St Nicholas'. The legend of the Red and White Ladies seem to overlap. A third ghost has apparently also been reported in the same place.
* The Screaming Woods, an area of forest outside of town supposedly haunted by the ghosts of many who became lost in the woods. It was given its name because you can supposedly still hear their screams from inside the forest at night.

 

 

 

Reculver History and background

Archaeological investigation at Reculver has found evidence of a pre-historic settlement on the site of a well known Roman fort,
or "castrum", which was built between 180 and 185 AD. About a century after the fort was built, a Roman naval commander named Carausius
was given the task of clearing pirates from the sea between Britannia and the European mainland. In so doing he established a new chain of
command, the British part of which was later to pass under the control of a "Count of the Saxon Shore". The "Notitia Dignitatum" shows that
the fort at Reculver, then known as "Regulbium", became part of this arrangement. It was also the location for a lighthouse and watch tower, 
presumably because of its strategic position at the northern entrance to the important Wantsum Channel, and covering the mouths of both
the River Thames and the River Medway.

The Crying Baby

According to legend there is often heard the sound of a crying baby, in the grounds of the fort and among the ruins of the church. Archaeological excavations conducted in the 1960s within the fort revealed several infant skeletons buried under the walls of Roman barrack blocks, which are estimated to have been built between approximately 30 and 100 AD.

Barnes Wallis Bouncing Bomb

The Reculver coastline is where Barnes Wallis was able to test the "bouncing bomb" used during the Second World War and is often cited for its connection with the "Dambusters" - 617 Squadron. It was in the shadow of the Twin Sisters that prototypes of Barnes Wallis's famous 'bouncing bombs' were secretly tested, which were to be used so successfully in the Dambusters raids. The final versions of these bombs were dropped on the Ruhr Dams on 17 May 1943, by a formation of Lancaster bombers led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson (for which he was awarded the VC).

 

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